BOHR WHEELER THEORY OF FISSION PDF

In assessing the prospects of large-scale energy release by means of fission, three basic questions needed to be answered. The first, the easiest, and the least important was: How much energy is released in a fission event? This is a question that Lise Meitner could answer in December , even as she and her nephew Otto Frisch were postulating the existence of fission. She knew the overall pattern of nuclear binding energies from the lightest to the heaviest elements, and reckoned that the fission of a uranium nucleus should release about 1 MeV per nucleon, or about MeV per fission event—a prediction soon verified by experiment. The reason the precise magnitude of the energy release is not very important is that this energy, quickly transformed to heat, is irrelevant to the nuclear course of events. Although it is obviously of great practical significance, fission energy contributes nothing to the chain-reaction process.

Author:Nikozil Kagajar
Country:Uzbekistan
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Spiritual
Published (Last):16 June 2004
Pages:423
PDF File Size:4.63 Mb
ePub File Size:6.80 Mb
ISBN:420-9-61796-350-5
Downloads:71542
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:JoJolkree



In assessing the prospects of large-scale energy release by means of fission, three basic questions needed to be answered. The first, the easiest, and the least important was: How much energy is released in a fission event? This is a question that Lise Meitner could answer in December , even as she and her nephew Otto Frisch were postulating the existence of fission. She knew the overall pattern of nuclear binding energies from the lightest to the heaviest elements, and reckoned that the fission of a uranium nucleus should release about 1 MeV per nucleon, or about MeV per fission event—a prediction soon verified by experiment.

The reason the precise magnitude of the energy release is not very important is that this energy, quickly transformed to heat, is irrelevant to the nuclear course of events. Although it is obviously of great practical significance, fission energy contributes nothing to the chain-reaction process.

The second question was: Which nuclei are most fissionable? Once these questions were answered, it could be decided whether a fission chain reaction could be self-sustaining, and if so, with what isotopes. Nuclear fission would have been a dramatic discovery at any time. Coming as it did on the eve of a major war and in the midst of a period of persecution of Jews in Germany, its drama was heightened.

Half a dozen years after the discovery of fission, the United States emerged as the scientific leader of the world, atomic energy was a household word, and ties forged between science and government set a pattern for the support of large-scale research that has lasted to the present day.

One small act in the total drama of fission was the theoretical work of Bohr and Wheeler in Using the liquid-droplet model of the nucleus, they provided an explanation of the fission process and predicted which nuclei should be most fissionable the second question above.

Apprised of the ideas of Frisch and Meitner just before leaving Copenhagen early in January, , Bohr pondered the idea of nuclear fission all the way across the Atlantic.

By the time he greeted his young colleague John Wheeler on the pier in New York, he had a half-completed theory of fission in his mind and therefore no inclination to question the validity of the evidence for fission. After five months of effort in Princeton, Bohr and Wheeler submitted for publication a paper that provided both a mathematical theory and a pictorial model of fission.

In essence, the Bohr-Wheeler theory is simple. Two forces are at work in a heavy nucleus: the nuclear force, holding the nucleus together, and the Coulomb electrical force, tending to blow the nucleus apart see the figure below. For all the nuclei we know, the nuclear force is in control, but for the heaviest known nuclei, it is only barely in control. The problem of the fissionability of a nucleus can be posed this way: If a nucleus is stretched into an elongated shape, what is greater—the repulsive electric force tending to push it into an even more elongated shape, or the attractive nuclear force tending to restore it to a spherical or near spherical shape?

If a nucleus like uranium is slightly distorted from its normal shape, the nuclear force wins out, tending to restore it to its original shape. If it is distorted much further, the electric force wins out and it splits in two or occasionally three. Between these two regions is an energy barrier. In slow spontaneous fission a rarity in naturally occurring elements , this barrier can be penetrated, just as a barrier is penetrated in alpha decay.

For the rapid fission that occurs in reactors or bombs, the barrier must be surmounted. The magnitude of the energy barrier to be overcome depends sensitively on the relative magnitude of two energies of opposite sign: the Coulomb electric energy, arising from the mutual repulsion of the protons; and the surface-tension energy, arising from the nuclear forces. From approximate considerations of these energies, one can extract a significant parameter, which measures nuclear fissionability.

The mechanism of fission. Attractive nuclear forces create an effective surface tension tending to keep the nucleus in near-spherical form. Electrical repulsion between protons tends to blow the nucleus apart. Below a critical deformation, the surface tension wins.

Beyond the critical deformation, the electrical repulsion wins. Consider first the electric energy. The larger the nucleus, the larger this average separation, in direct proportion to the nuclear radius R. The number of distinct proton pairs is equal to Z Z — 1 , since each of the Z protons can pair off with Z — 1 other protons. The other relevant energy is the nuclear surface-tension energy. It is proportional to the surface area of the nucleus, or to the square of the nuclear radius:.

Since the cube of the nuclear radius is proportional to the nuclear volume, which in turn is proportional to the number of nucleons in the nucleus 1 the mass number A , one can write. The greater its magnitude, the more nearly does the repulsive electric force win out over the attractive nuclear force, and the more easily fissionable is the nucleus. Consider nuclei of the two principal isotopes of uranium, to each of which a neutron is added:.

Because of this small difference, the fission energy barrier is slightly lower for U than for U Another and even more important contributor to the distinction between the fissionability of these two isotopes is the somewhat greater excitation energy provided when U absorbs a neutron than when U absorbs a neutron.

This is attributable, ultimately, to the exclusion principle, which favors an even number of protons and of neutrons.

In U , the absorption of a slow neutron provides enough energy to surmount the fission barrier. In U it does not. The difference is all-important. Most of the neutrons emitted during fission are of relatively low energy, capable of inducing further fission in U but not in U Mechanics — M1. Vectors vs. Vector Quantities; Scalars vs. Scalar Quantities M2.

Inertial Mass M7. Gravitational Mass — M8. Angular Momentum Characteristics M9. Energy, A Central Concept M What Is Thermodynamics T2. Heat Vs. Internal Energy T3. Frozen Degrees Of Freedom T5. Available And Unavailable Energy T7. Entropy On Two Levels T8. Subtleties Of Entropy T9. Charge E2. Monopoles, Not! Inductance E6. The Nature Of Light E7. Transformations: Galilean And Lorentz R3. The Principle Of Equivalence R Geometrodynamics Quantum Physics — Q1.

Granularity Q3. Probability Q4. Annihilation And Creation Q5. The Uncertainty Principle Q7. Feynman Diagrams Nuclear Physics — N1. Science: Creation Vs. Discovery G3. Is There A Scientific Method? What Is A Theory? Natural Units, Dimensionless Physics G7. Three Kinds Of Probability G8. The Forces Of Nature G9. Superposition G The Submicroscopic Frontier: Reductionism G Submicroscopic Chaos G T he discovery of fission was a seed dropped on fertile ground.

With remarkable speed, Niels Bohr and John Wheeler published a theory of the dynamic process of fission. With equal speed, physicists grasped its practical potentialities. Home About the Author Contact.

3213 SAYL MADEN KANUNU PDF

N6. Bohr-Wheeler Theory Of Fission

On the basis of the liquid drop model of atomic nuclei, an account is given of the mechanism of nuclear fission. In particular, conclusions are drawn regarding the variation from nucleus to nucleus of the critical energy required for fission, and regarding the dependence of fission cross section for a given nucleus on energy of the exciting agency. A detailed discussion of the observations is presented on the basis of the theoretical considerations. Theory and experiment fit together in a reasonable way to give a satisfactory picture of nuclear fission.

OMAN AIR TIMETABLE PDF

.

BUSINESS LAW 14TH EDITION MALLOR PDF

.

Related Articles